Arkansas Kayaking Laws (Rules and Regulations)


Arkansas Kayaking Laws - Rules and Regulations

Before you Kayak or canoe in Arkansas, you should familiarize yourself with some very specific Arkansas kayaking laws. Because of all the states, Arkansas has some rules and regulations specifically aimed at kayakers, canoes and other paddlers.

However, don’t let that stop you, because the 135-mile long Buffalo National River in Northern Arkansas—the first national river in the United States—is reason enough to kayak in Arkansas.

Arkansas Kayaking Laws

  • Arkansas Kayak Law – kayaks, canoes and SUPs are considered non-powered vessels in Arkansas. However, there are some special regulations for them.
  • Kayak Registration – Vessels that aren’t propelled by an engine or by sail don’t need registration.
  • Motorized Kayak Registration – You must have a registration and boat decals to legally operate a powered vessel or sailboat.
  • Kayaking Operator Licensing – Anyone born after January 1, 1986, must have successfully completed an approved Boating Education Course.
  • Motorized Kayaking Age – While operating a boat with an engine 10 horsepower or more, a person 12 years of age or older must satisfy the boating education requirement and be under the direct supervision of a person at least 18 years old.
  • Kayaking Alcohol Law – It’s illegal to operate a motor boat if you have a blood alcohol level (BAL) of 0.08% or more, or under 21 and have a 0.02% BAL or more.
  • Kayaking Life Jacket Law – One USCG approved life jacket, properly sized, per person. And children 12 and younger must wear it at all times.
  • Kayaking Lights Law – Between sunset and sunrise and during periods of restricted visibility, you must have legal lighting.
  • Kayaking Sounding Devices – Vessels less than 39.4 feet (12 meters) in length are required to carry a whistle or horn.
  • Kayaking VDS Law – No visual distress signaling device is required in Arkansas.

That’s the summary of Arkansas boating laws as they apply to kayaking, canoeing and SUPs. Discover the details on each of them below on exactly how to have a safe and legal good time paddling.

Arkansas Kayaking and Canoeing Laws

Most of Arkansas’ kayak and canoe-specific laws pertain to small paddling “…vessels easily susceptible to swamping, tipping or rolling…” And they are mainly designed to prevent pollution due to accidental littering.

There are four Arkansas kayak-specific Rules/Laws you must follow:

1 – Glass Containers Prohibited

No glass containers are allowed in canoes, kayaks, inner tubes or other vessels easily susceptible to swamping, tipping or rolling within the banks of Arkansas navigable waterways, except containers for substances prescribed by a licensed physician.

However, people engaged in removing glass previously discarded by others and found within the banks of an Arkansas navigable waterway may not be charged with a violation for possessing that glass if it is being transported in a secure trash container.

Arkansas Game & Fish Commission – Paddle Sports

2 – Fasten Cooler Lids

All food and beverages in canoes, kayaks, inner tubes or other vessels easily susceptible to swamping, tipping, rolling must be contained in a sealable or lockable cooler or container that prevents the contents from spilling in the water.

Arkansas Game & Fish Commission – Paddle Sports

3 – Attach and Use a Trash Container

All canoes, kayaks, inner tubes and other vessels easily susceptible to swamping, tipping or rolling carrying food or beverages must have an attached closeable trash container. The container must be of sturdy construction, or it may be a bag of mesh construction. All trash must be safely and lawfully disposed of. A container is not required for people traveling without foodstuffs or beverages.

Arkansas Game & Fish Commission – Paddle Sports

4 – Use a Floating Holder for Beverages

All beverages not securely contained in a cooler or litter bag must be held in a floating holder or other device designed to prevent it from sinking beneath the water’s surface.

Arkansas Game & Fish Commission – Paddle Sports

Kayak Registration Laws

Non-motorized Kayak Registration

Do you have to register a kayak in Arkansas? The quick answer is no. Vessels that aren’t propelled by an engine or by sail don’t need registration in Arkansas. The only exceptions are vessels that are not propelled by an engine or by sail.

Motorized Kayak Registration

Do you have to register a kayak with a trolling motor in Arkansas? The quick answer is yes. Boats propelled by sail or motor (including trolling motors) of any type must be registered when operated on public waters. You must have an Arkansas Certificate of Number (registration) and validation decals to operate a motorboat on Arkansas’ public waters.

Proof of Hull Identification Number (HIN) Requirement

As of January 1, 2017 you must verify the HIN of your vessel in order to register a motor boat.

Registration Resources

Arkansas Kayaking Education Laws

Non-motorized Kayak Operator Licensing

Do you have to have a boating license to operate a kayak in Arkansas? Anyone born after January 1, 1986, in order to operate a motorboat or sailboat (if you put a sail on your kayak, this qualifies) must have successfully completed an approved Arkansas Game & Fish Commission (AGFC) Boating Education Course.

Motorized Kayak Operator Licensing

Do I need a boating license for a motorized kayak in Arkansas? For a motorboat powered by an engine 10 horsepower or more, a person 12 years of age or older must satisfy the boating education requirement and be under the direct supervision of a person at least 18 years old.

Arkansas Boater Education Course

Arkansas Kayaking Alcohol and Drug Laws

Boating While Intoxicated (BWL) Law

Can you get a DUI on a kayak in Arkansas? The quick answer is yes. Arkansas has enacted a Boating While Intoxicated (BWI) laws that are very strict. In Arkansas, you’re considered to be intoxicated if you have a BAL (blood alcohol level) of 0.08% or higher, or if you’re under 21 and have a BAL of 0.02% or more. Arkansas BWI laws include motorboats, other vessel, and the manipulation of water skis.

You’re considered intoxicated if:

  • You have a blood alcohol level (BAL) of 0.08% or more
  • You’re under 21 and have a 0.02% BAL or more
  • You’re under the influence of alcohol and/or a controlled substance to such a degree that your reactions, motor skills, and judgment are substantially altered and you present a clear danger of physical injury or death to yourself or to others. (and that pretty much leaves it up to the individual officer to determine whether you are intoxicated even if your BAL is less than the legal limit.)

Arkansas boating law also includes this verbiage, “This includes the operation of any motorboat or other vessel, or manipulation of water skis or other device, while under the influence of alcohol, a controlled substance, or both.”

Related Article:Can You Get a DUI on a Kayak?

BWI Penalties

Here’s a summary of Arkansas BWI penalties:

  • First conviction – you could lose your actual driver’s license for a period of 6 months. In addition, you could get fined up to $1,000 and jailed up to a year.
  • Second conviction – you could lose your driver’s license for 24 months, get fined up to $3,000 and jailed for a minimum of 7 days up to one year.
  • Third conviction – you could lose your driver’s license for 30 months, get fined up to $5,000 and jailed a minimum of 90 days up to one year.
  • In addition, if you get a BWI in Arkansas, you’ll have to, at your own expense, complete an alcohol education program approved by the Arkansas Highway Safety Program or an alcoholism treatment program approved by the Division of Behavioral Health Services.

Arkansas Kayaking PFD Laws

Are life jackets required on kayaks in Arkansas?

The simple answer is yes. Boating statistics are showing that while recreational boating deaths are on the decline, that as more people participate in the paddling sports, deaths in kayaking canoeing and SUP are increasing. Lack of PFD knowledge and use are a big factor in this.

Arkansas PFD Age Laws

Children 12 years and younger must wear a fitted USCG-approved PFD while in a kayak or canoe.

One PFD Per Person

Everyone in a kayak, canoe or SUP is required to have a USCG-approved wearable type PFD. They must be:

  • Correctly sized based on body weight and chest size
  • In good serviceable condition
  • Readily accessible

Do I need a Type IV PFD on my kayak in Arkansas?

The quick answer is yes. If the kayak or canoe is 16 feet or longer it’s required to have one type IV throwable PFD on board.

Related Article: Kayak Life Jacket Laws by State (50 State List)

Arkansas Kayaking Lights Laws

What lights do I need on my kayak at night?

All motor boats need to have lighting sufficient to make their presence and location known to other vessels. They must be displayed:

  • between sunrise and sunset
  • during periods of restricted visibility

Unpowered Vessel Lights While Underway

Arkansas has several lakes and rivers under federal jurisdiction. On federal waters the following rules apply to sailboats or vessels that are paddled, poled, or rowed.

If less than 23 feet long:

  • If it’s practical, these vessels should have red and green sidelights visible from 2 miles away.
  • If it’s not practical, you should have on hand at least one lantern or flashlight shining a white light.

NOTE: Blue lights are reserved for law enforcement use.

Lights While Moored or Anchored

All vesselsare required to display a steady white light visible from all directions for at least 2 nautical miles whenever they are moored or anchored away from a dock between sunset and sunrise.

So if you’re anchored up kayak fishing at night, you’ll need that light.

Arkansas Kayaking Sounding Devices Laws

Do I need a sounding device to kayak in Arkansas?

The quick answer is yes. Vessels less than 39.4 feet (12 meters) in length and operating in Arkansas state waters are required to carry a whistle or horn or some other means to make an efficient sound signal audible for at least one-half mile.

However, the U.S. Coast Guard’s Minimum Equipment Requirements for Recreational Vessels document states that kayaks and canoes must at least have a whistle.

Sound-producing devices must be capable of producing a blast that lasts at least four seconds.

Reasons you should carry a sounding device when you Kayak.

  • Reduced visibility in fog or darkness
  • The small size of most kayaks, canoes and paddle boards
  • The ability to sound your intentions or to hail for help

The best and most convenient “sounding” device for paddlers is a whistle attached to your PFD in a place that makes it easy and quick to get into your mouth and use it to signal.

VDS – Visual Distress Signaling

VDS devices aren’t required on Arkansas state waters, but it’s a good idea to carry one anyway, especially at night.

  • Handheld flares
  • A flare gun
  • Handheld smoke device (orange)
  • An electric lantern

Are all examples of practical VSDs for your kayak or canoe.

Arkansas Kayaking Fire Extinguisher Laws

Do I need a fire extinguisher on my trolling kayak?

The quick answer is no. The United States Coast Guard rules are you must carry one B-I (fire extinguisher) if you have:

  • An Inboard engine
  • Living spaces
  • Double-bottoms that are not sealed to the hull
  • Closed compartments where portable fuel tanks are stored
  • Permanently installed fuel tanks

Your kayak or canoe, even with an engine, most likely has none of those and thus doesn’t require you have a fire extinguisher.

Additional Arkansas Boating Resources

The specific details of Arkansas kayak, canoe, and SUP rules can be found on the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s website in the Laws for Kayaks and Canoes on Arkansas Waterways page.

Arkansas Boating Enforcement Entities

Arkansas boating laws are enforced by AGFC officers, sheriffs, deputy sheriffs, state police officers, Department of Parks and Tourism enforcement officers, municipal police officers, and U.S. Coast Guard personnel.

Boating Safety Education Resources

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